Employer Branding from a Marketing Perspective: CMOs & Marketing Experts Share Advice on How to Balance Consumer Brand and Employer Brand

September 26, 2018

As much as today’s company leaders and HR teams are willing to acknowledge how critical employer branding is for their organization’s success (in fact, here are 20+ CEOs sharing their opinion on how employer branding impacts business success), this unfortunately doesn’t automatically translate into those companies fully prioritizing and managing their employer brand effectively.

There are a few main reasons (or excuses) for this, which are pretty straightforward: either there is a lack of ownership of the topic of employer branding within the organization, a lack of budget available for employer branding initiatives, or other times it’s just a matter of sheer procrastination.

But there’s another excuse many companies rely on for not prioritizing their employer brand – one that’s a bit more complex – and that is a belief that they’re already doing enough with their consumer brand…so why bother to do more with employer brand?

At the root of this excuse is the assumption that consumer branding and employer branding both cover the same things, but we all know that they don’t, right? Well, we wanted to tackle this excuse head on by fully exploring the relationship between consumer branding and employer branding. What better way to do that than by consulting the experts in all things branding – marketing executives.

We went ahead and sought out opinions from over 15 CMOs and marketing experts and specifically asked them to weigh in on these three questions about consumer branding vs. employer branding:

  1. How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?
  2. Do they both matter?
  3. How should companies balance both?

 

Below are all of the in-depth answers this group of CMOs and experienced marketing executives shared with us. What you’ll find is that a lot of their perspectives were very similar; employer branding, while indeed linked to your consumer brand, serves its own distinct purposes and therefore needs it’s own attention rather than being lumped together with consumer branding. And given their differences, the experts also share some very valuable thoughts on how to balance each type of branding which many companies can learn from:

 

Dave Lastovskiy, Director of Marketing at Bus.com

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Your employer brand and consumer brand are certainly different. First, let’s think about your product. Your consumer product is what you’re selling to generate revenue, whereas your employer brand is what you’re leveraging to purchase talent.

Ultimately there should be overlap with both. Your employees are producing something for an audience, therefore they should be able to empathize and relate with their needs and desires.

However, your employer branding must answer the question: what purpose is my organization filling for this individual?

This will change dependent on the type of people you’re looking to attract (generational background, experience levels, education levels, etc).

In short: treat your employer brand with the understanding you’re selling your company to potential employees. Understand what they desire (competitive salaries, vacation time, education) and adjust your value props accordingly.

2) Do they both matter?

Yes, absolutely. Today, with unemployment at record lows, the competition for great talent is increasingly challenging. Additionally, income alone will not win over talented employees. Individuals seek autonomy, flexibility, on top of competitive salaries. If you’re looking to attract talented individuals, understand that they will have options. Your employer branding needs the capacity to stand out, and win them over.

3) How should companies balance both?

All companies are resource constrained. Therefore it’s important to understand: what are you constrained most by? If you need more talented employees, then companies should place a heavier weight on employee branding.

If you’re currently not hiring, invest those resources back to your organization by treating them with unexpected perks.

 


Kimberlee Bochek, Digital Web Specialist at Florida Medical Clinic 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

At Florida Medical Clinic, we’ve opted to keep the employer brand separate from our consumer brand on social media platforms such as Facebook. We have separate Facebook pages for FMC Careers and FMC Patients, and the content is tailored to these individual audiences. By segmenting our audiences on social media, we’re able to reach those who will benefit most from different sets of information, and allow for higher engagement within each page.

For example, a post about our Employee Benefits program may not resonate with patients as much as job candidates — in the same way that a post promoting our 24/7 Online Appointment Request form isn’t super relevant to the job search. Yet, we can get both sets of information out to the right audience at the right time.

Additionally, having two separate Facebook pages for FMC Careers and FMC Patients makes for a great bank of content to share across platforms to help us represent one, cohesive corporate brand of Florida Medical Clinic. This is key – the main thing to keep in mind is ensuring the overall brand is consistent. Utilize similar color schemes, post-types and tone of voice to avoid coming across as disjointed or confusing.

2) Do they both matter?

Yes! One could not exist without the other – By actively engaging and recruiting high-quality job candidates, we’re able to uphold an exceptional patient experience and thus, a strong consumer-facing brand overall.

3) How should companies balance both?

Companies can balance the employer brand and consumer brand in many different ways – The large size of our ever-evolving company helped dictate a need for separate social media pages and content. For small to medium-sized companies or start-ups, it might be best to stick to one corporate brand that addresses both facets simultaneously. For example, posting a fun video that touches on company culture and a new product launch could balance the needs of both audiences. Ultimately, it takes an honest assessment of your branding goals and target audience. Let your audience be the teachers, and always be ready to learn from them and adapt based on their needs.

 


Ryan Bonnici, CMO of G2 Crowd

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

When it comes to marketing, it’s all about the ‘buyer persona’.  Similarly, when it comes to recruiting, it’s all about your ’employee persona’. Identify what kinds of employees you’re trying to attract to your business, and authentically showcase to them who you are, what your values are, and what kinds of similar people they will be working with.

2) Do they both matter?

They absolutely both matter – but they’re also both super related. Over the past 10 years, whenever I’ve looked at joining a new company, I’ve not only evaluated their employee brand from their employees on Glassdoor – but I’ve done the same for their product expertise on G2 Crowd. A company with a great culture won’t last long if they don’t have a great product that their customers love. So they’re both super important to me.

3) How should companies balance both?

Ultimately I think the marketing team should be responsible for the consumer brand [and the brand marketing that goes along with it] while the recruiting team (with help from marketing) should be more responsible for the recruiting / employer brand. While the content and channels might be different, it’s still marketing at the end of the day – taking the employer brand to market, so current and future employees learn more about it.

 


Becca Hoeft, Chief Brand Officer of Sunrise Banks 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Brands are essentially a vehicle for creating meaning and trust. So, when you think about brands, like Apple or Harley Davidson, that have done this – they have created believers that embed themselves with the brand. To build a system of believers, you have to start with a strategic brand narrative and build it from the inside, out. It’s not about the flashy perks and free food, but about the values, behaviors and day-to-day interactions that define your organization.

2) Do they both matter?

Not only do they both matter, they are tied to each other. If your employer brand is at odds with your consumer brand, they will have trouble growing. Tying them together to build an employer brand that feeds your consumer brand is key. It’s not about the flashy perks and free food, but about the values, behaviors and day-to-day interactions that define your organization. Start with your employees and make sure that they know, understand, and believe the strategic brand narrative – this isn’t just at the top level, it needs to be throughout your company, something that is embedded into your company’s DNA. However, it is important that each leader understands the narrative and lives as an example of that narrative. Be sure that each employee has a connection and feels like they are doing something special with your organization.

3) How should companies balance both?

The balance of the brand comes from their common ground. Once you have established your employer brand and begin to push it outward, you need to continuously listen to your internal and external advocates. This allows you to tweak your approach and make sure the message is not only correct, but that it is serving your mission and your customers and employees. Simply hoping that this narrative and culture will grow organically is not a reliable method, each company needs to own and curate their narrative by doing research and designing the experience that will build and become your organization’s culture. Ultimately, when you curate a special and unique experience for employees to connect to, it will become a differentiator and become a way to attract and retain talent that reflect these values. Once you have a successful internal brand, your employees will become your best brand ambassadors and advocates – and what’s more powerful than word of mouth and positive customer experience? Once you have built out the strategic narrative on the inside, you can start building it on the outside, for the consumer, with the same values and behaviors that embody your internal brand.

 


Andrew Barlowe, Chief Marketing Officer at Direct Call Solutions

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Your brand is key to creating the best first and last impression on potential and existing clients. It’s very difficult for some owners/executives to see the value in spending on a brand when those funds could be allocated to generating more income. This is far from reality. The truth is building a sustainable and reputable brand will pay dividends over time. Brands build incrementally rather than funds allocated to gain a single customer or logo.

Developing your brand strategy is the backbone of the operation and everyone from c-level to the parking attendant should understand and be proud to be a part of it. The initial brand strategy will come from the founders, but the best brands have sought out insight from its most important resource, the people driving the brand each day; the staff.

2) Do they both matter?

Yes, they do. The employer and the consumer brand need to be distinct, yet not completely different from each other. One should complement the other. Creating a brand, both consumer and employer, creates a community. Communities promotes a feeling of familiarity. People feel comfortable with things they are familiar with and recognize.

3) How should companies balance both?

Define your long-term strategy. This is done with help from the executives in charge, and your most important resource; your staff. These are the people driving the brand each day. Insight from both will help guide you to discovering when to put the consumer brand first and when to put the employer brand first.

 


Sean Si, CEO and Founder of SEO Hacker 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

As the CEO and Founder of our company for almost a decade now, I noticed that employer branding is one of the most underrated aspects of a company that a large number of us do not take into consideration. Employer branding should be one of the most important aspects of a company that presidents should always take note of. As compared to consumer branding, employer branding should have the same level of importance.

2) Do they both matter?

There has to be a balance between your efforts on your consumer branding and your employer branding. This is all due to the fact that improving your consumer branding helps grow your business by targeting the right audience for your business. Meanwhile, improving your employer branding helps you build a team that possesses all the skills your company needs and will be loyal team members for you. Both of these brands matter to your business’ growth and improvement.

3) How should companies balance both?

It is quite difficult to balance between the two since they both have the same degree of importance, however, it all starts with knowing what your company is lacking. Conduct a thorough research if your consumer demographics are what you, initially, wanted to target, study your team’s performance and check if they are producing the results you want. Knowing is the first step to improving. If you don’t like your current consumer demographic, then there is something lacking in your consumer branding. If you don’t like the results that your team is producing, then you might not be hiring the correct people.

 


Preeti Adhikary, VP of Marketing at Fusemachines Inc. 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

An employer brand allows an organization to showcase its human aspect – the people. It can be used to show their team to the world through employee blog posts, video interviews, surveys, etc. Employer brand can be fun and casual as long as it is professional. Things that matter to the employees – diversity, social impact, etc – can be highlighted through the employer brand.

2) Do they both matter?

Both are equally important. Your company/consumer brand is how you want your current & potential customers to view you. As an organization, it is your platform to showcase your expertise and your product(s)/service(s). Your company brand should answer the question Why should I become your client? How can you help me?

Your employee brand is how you want current & potential employees to perceive your company’s culture and work environment. It should answer the question Why should I work for you?

3) How should companies balance both?

While the two brands are different in their objectives, the core mission is the same. Companies should make sure the brands are aligned and that they reflect the values of the company. Both brands can have a ‘human’ component (that people can relate to or aspire to become) and help establish the organization.

 


John Cloonan, Director of Marketing at Kinetix

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

In the current job market, companies should be treating their employer brand with the same level of focus and care as they do their consumer brand. Brand equity is built through both of those activities, and the ongoing ability to deliver – a key component of quality – hinges on the being able to attract the right talent. The employer brand should also garner enough resources to be compelling in the talent markets. In some industries, that could mean spend levels nearly comparable with the consumer brand.

2) Do they both matter?

Does having the people you need to create and deliver your product or service matter? The question really is that simple. Unless you have talent pounding at your door and begging to work for you, your employer brand matters. Of course your consumer brand matters – you can’t drive revenue without customers, but you need people on your team who can keep the trains running effectively.

3) How should companies balance both?

Companies need to figure out the level of focus and resources required to attract the talent they want to fulfill the revenue they’ve forecast, and budget appropriately. The employer and consumer brands should, of course, be related and consistent while targeted to the audiences they’re trying to attract. One should compliment the other and send consistent messaging about the company’s purpose and values.

 


Jesse Ghiorzi, Director, Brand Strategy at Charge

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

With millennials and Gen Z making up large portions of the workforce and a lower unemployment rate, employer brands are crucial. For mid-size and large businesses, employer branding is the top way you attract – or repel – the talent you need to run and grow your company. These businesses should treat their employer brand with the same care and attention they do their consumer-facing brand. Small businesses should still consider their employer brand, but if they’re only hiring a handful of people or less each year it isn’t as important for them.

2) Do they both matter?

As mentioned above, both your consumer and employer brands matter. Marketing is typically more focused on the consumer brand, so it’s talent/HR’s job to put in the creativity and effort to define, build and protect the employer brand.

3) How should companies balance both?

If you’re in a competitive industry where high skilled workers are a necessity, you should be spending a lot of time on your employer brand. In most cases, you’re not targeting the same people as customers AND employees, so segmenting your brands here is not as hard as it sounds. Channels like Indeed, LinkedIn, Glassdoor and other social job sites can be employer brand focused. Your PR tactics, main website, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook should run around an 80/20 mix, favoring consumer brand over employer brand.

 


Kamyar Shah, Fractional CMO 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

The differentiation between employee and employer brand is futile; those two have a symbiotic relationship. The same goes for consumer brands.

2) Do they both matter?

Of course both matter. Positive branding from any aspect and any level usually has a positive impact on overall brand perception. The brand value is transferable both in depth and breadth.

3) How should companies balance both?

It needs to be a cumulative effort that enables branding from any/every level. The benefits are mutual to all; employee, employer and the company. The storytelling portion of a brand can work its way all the way up to the corporate level.

 


Alex Membrillo, CEO of Cardinal Digital Marketing 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Managing the employer brand is an essential component of a company’s branding and public relations strategy. This includes managing the brand on employee review platforms, such as Glassdoor, as well as managing the reputations of key leadership.

When a prospect is researching your company, don’t just assume that their review will begin and end on your website. LinkedIn profiles and other public profiles should align with the image and messaging of your brand. In fact, these are great channels to showcases the expertise of your top executives.

2) Do they both matter?

Yes, both the employer and consumer brands matter. Your employer brand is not only visible to consumers, but also impacts the type of talent your company is able to attract. If the employer brand is struggling, that could have an adverse effect on the consumer brand, or vise versa.

3) How should companies balance both?

Have a management strategy in place for both the consumer brand and the employer brand. Make sure the strategies are in alignment with each other.

If your brand is positioned to be cutting edge or innovative, that should be reflected in your messaging across the board. Or if your company is focused on quality, keep messaging consistent about that. In other words, your CEO shouldn’t be generating content or social posts discussing how to excel at quantity over quality, if that’s off brand.


Blair Koch, CEO of The Alternative Board – Denver West

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

The brand for employees and consumers should be the same. If you treat your employees well – have a strong, positive, caring culture internally, then that will be reflected in how your employees treat your customers, suppliers, etc.

2) Do they both matter?

One consistent brand is all that is needed, internally and externally, to drive your desired results.

3) How should companies balance both?

Commit your employer brand to paper and make sure to translate it to every employee, from the top down. This way, you won’t have to worry about balance. The positive employer brand will trickle down to your customers.

 


Robyn Young, CEO and Head of Brand Strategy at Robyn Young & Co

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

In an ideal world, there is no separation between a public facing brand and what a company promotes internally. When working on brand strategy with clients, we like to have a representative from each internal department collaborate on the culture and core value development of the brand. In each exercise, we brainstorm keywords that not only represent the strengths of the product or business, but also speak to what the company values internally along with how the company’s success would change the world, their industry, or even their customer’s life. We then have the team leads work with their individual teams to brainstorm ideas on how to bring that vision to life in their own day-to-day operations.

2) Do they both matter?

Absolutely. The public facing brand is what creates the business, but the internal culture is what drives the business effectively. As Gen Z and Millenial employees are entering the work force and taking over leadership roles, they are searching for more than just bonuses and benefits. They want purpose. They need to feel that they connect to the brand and that their work is meaningful towards the bigger goal and vision of the company. If they don’t feel this way, their work begins to suffer or they start looking for greener pastures.

3) How should companies balance both?

I find that many times it’s just a matter of strategy. Taking a fresh look at the core pillars, mission statement, and vision of the company and breaking it down into bite sized pieces that relate to each department helps to create a culture of purpose that not only functions better but their happier with their jobs too.

 


Matt Erickson, Marketing Director of National Positions

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Agencies and companies should be treating both their employer brand and their consumer brand as two sides of the same coin. The values and core principles that a brand builds on the employer side reflect the results provided to the consumer side. If a brand has fractured communication and is lacking processes internally – this same reality will show itself (externally) to customers. However, if a brand has core values that feed its processes – and that brand is willing to invest in a healthy workplace culture – this same attention to progress and results will be more likely to spill over into positive results on the customer side. 

2) Do they both matter?

Yes. They both matter. Can you have a fractured work culture and still produce great results for the client? Yes. But in the long-term, problems are likely going to present themselves. Companies should balance both by really understanding that one feeds the other. They work hand in hand. Like gaining the return on a stock investment, you need to invest on the front end to reap the benefits in the future.  

3) How should companies balance both?

Businesses today seem to forget that it often takes years to solidify and start turning sizable profits. Choose your team carefully and invest in their growth internally so your team feels like they are invested (and key) to the overall growth of the brand.

 


Grace Lanuza, Founder & CEO of Grace Lanuza Brand Strategy + Consulting Group 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Companies should treat their employment brand just as much if not better than the consumer brand. The consumer brand and company as a whole is just as good if there is top talent behind it so if the employment brand isn’t aligned to attracting the talent with the skill set that makes the overall brand thrive, then they need to make adjustments in order to do so. We see a lot of companies go through hyper growth and are stuck in an endless cycle of needing top talent but not having the “street cred” so to speak with having an attractive employment brand and they’re in a position that is trying to catch up with the demand.

2) Do they both matter?

Yes! The employment brand sets the tone for the consumer brand. How so? Well, by having a strong employment brand then the more successful a company has attracting top talent who are a value match and who will thrive in the company culture. Happy team members are more apt to promote the consumer brand that’s in line with values and lifestyle outside of the office. We worked with a client who wasn’t attracting top talent and had high turn over, therefore also affecting their service levels. Upon auditing their employment brand, over 60% of the team didn’t feel they would recommend even their own position to someone outside the company. That speaks volume for the inside culture of the company! The inside game affects the outside game.

3) How should companies balance both?

Companies can balance both by not only attracting the top talent but actually keeping them! They will be the biggest advocate of the work culture and promote the employment brand from the inside out, usually without even prompting. A healthy work environment encourages people to be proud of saying who they working for and how great it is to be a part of a team whose employment brand resonates. With the new generation, it’s not about compensation (anyone can make money anywhere!) but it’s about how they can grow as individuals, how they’re valued as a team member and how the company support causes that are of value through corporate social responsibility.

 


Jackie Rednour-Bruckman, CMO of MyWorkDrive 

3) How should companies balance both?

With the same dedication and diligence spent on protecting their consumer brand. Reputation is everything in business. One awful customer review or one bad marketing campaign can erode trust and loyalty for your brand. It’s the same kind of philosophy regarding your employer brand and company culture. For example If your brand is about fun travel and unique experiences then word getting out on places like Glassdoor or other public facing review sites that HQ is run in a culture of fear and intimidation then that disconnect from what you are selling will make your brand messaging fall flat and not resonate with finicky and fickle consumers.

2) Do they both matter?

Absolutely. In the age of #MeToo and #TimesUp, we are witnessing in real time how bad actors will be not be tolerated or protected by their company and damage control is swift and decisive. Also, when whistleblowers are punished or stigmatized by organizations this can be extremely damaging to a company’s reputation and lead people to boycott or lose interest in their products.

Social media has changed everything. One person and a hashtag can draw attention impactfully and sometimes make or break a brand if their company culture is lacking. The statements don’t even have to be true for some damage to happen. Perception at times becomes reality. What about smaller brands and companies where they want and need to recruit the best talent but can’t always afford to pay top dollar while they seek investment capital? Becoming an exceptional place to work for and at will bridge that gap. Talented workers want flexibility and lead a balanced life and not have to spend most of their lives commuting. Generous benefits packages including PTO, establishing a culture of altruism, pet friendly, and an atmosphere of mutual respect and integrity are just some of the things a company can do to lift up their workforce. CMOs can position the section of a company’s web site regarding jobs and opportunities to spell out why it’s such a great place to work at and why someone should want to join the team. The About Us section of any company web site shouldn’t be the only place you get familiar with what a company is and stands for. HR should be spearheading the experience of where one works and not just administering employee onboarding or filing grievances. All department heads who supervise people should be actively trained on best practices AND engendering loyalty and productivity at the same time.

If you do not inspire and lead people and give clear direction on what company strategy and defining products are, people will start looking elsewhere and if you don’t treat them with kindness and respect, you will lose people.

3) How should companies balance both?

Hire the right people for leadership and management positions, have a clear handbook and policy guidelines for all staff to sign off on, have regular trainings, comply with all legal HR obligations around training as well, lead by example from the top, have a strong HR dept. that investigates fully, empower staff to speak up and share issues in a safe setting, Clearly dictate that there is a zero tolerance policy on any kind of harassment and that each person has a personal responsibility to represent the brand at all times.

 


Stacy Caprio, CEO of Accelerated Growth Marketing 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Companies should make sure they have a clearly aligned employer and consumer-facing brand. If the company’s employees do not feel aligned with the company values, culture and brand internally, they will have a hard time conveying that externally when interfacing with customers and creating outward facing company materials.

2) Do they both matter?

Both matter in the sense that they should be clearly aligned and a part of the company culture.

3) How should companies balance both?

They should have a clear values and brand document that internal employees can use when conducting internal business, as well as an aligned external brand document, so employees know what is expected of them and the company brand at all times.

 


Maria Mangion, Content & Community Manager for Bojoko at Good Game

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Consumer brands have always held sway for companies because of how fundamental they are to the business, and this is still where most company resources are funnelled. Employer brands are catching up now though! We’re seeing big employer brands match, and in some cases, even overtake the renown and appeal of consumer brands in our industry. Candidates eyeing iGaming careers sometimes identify with an attractive employer brand more readily than with its products. Top companies hunt for top talent by broadcasting their strengths, successes and employee benefits out there. I see this investment as a competitive edge in a market that’s increasingly aware of how culture is a major factor in determining long-term workplace fulfillment.

2) Do they both matter?

Yes, both matter very much. A company’s consumer brand drives its business but the employer brand is what brings in the A-team to achieve it in the first place. Companies are paying more and more attention to their employer brand because they’re starting to acknowledge this link and seeing positive results emerge from this enhanced focus. It’s always about making your future best employees flock to you.

3) How should companies balance both?

Of course, no employer brand is worth sacrificing the health of your consumer brand for. It’s up to each individual company to devise strategic plans to promote the growth of both brands in a symbiotic way. One idea is to connect employee performance with the employer brand – for example, introducing a new employee-friendly initiative when an important consumer brand target is met. This already happens quite organically in companies that have nailed the balance.

 


Shivakumar Ganesan, CEO and Co-founder of Exotel 

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Employer branding is a very important aspect of building a company. At every stage of the company, employer branding has to evolve to solve different problems. In the early stages of the company, it is about finding that core team of people who believe in the values and the vision of what you’re building. It is that team’s belief that helps you create a strong foundation for building a successful company. For a mid sized company, you need to find a set of people who will help you carry the culture of what you’ve built thus far and set the tone for building a successful company that is finding it’s own voice. For a large company, it is about making sure you find the best set of people to work with, still perpetuating the original vision of the company you wanted to build.

2) Do they both matter?

Employer branding and corporate branding need to go hand in hand and be based on a similar vision. In the age of increased and improved transparency, if the two are not in sync, it sends out a wrong signal to future customers.

3) How should companies balance both?

At Exotel, we’ve had our customer refer people to join Exotel. Customers also take Exotel with them when they switch companies. Likewise with employees. So, in our experience, the two are intricately intertwined.

 


Jenna Erickson, Marketing Manager at Codal  

1) How should companies be treating their employer brand, especially in comparison to their consumer brand?

Your employer brand should include humor, diffusing any workplace tension and showing a more enjoyable work environment. It should also be level-less, this means that the c-level executives should treat everyone equal, no matter their work status. Showing that your C-level executives treat everyone with kindness (even interns!), is what will make people want to work for you. Lastly, your employer brand needs to show the why; Why should someone work for you? What goal is everyone working toward at your company?Free snacks, having standing desks, and 3 weeks of PTO is probably not enough in today’s competitive work landscape.

A consumer brand should be considered a little differently. Although, showing the ‘why’ is just as important when it comes to your consumer-brand, it should also show your expertise, and be targeted to a different audience: your buyers.

2) Do they both matter?

Both consumer-facing brands and employer brands are extremely important and are necessary. People are the backbone of most successful companies, so without an employer brand, your company may have a harder time retaining talent. Consumer-facing branding is just as important because it is how the world will perceive your product or service.

3) How should companies balance both?

A great way to balance both is to have your actual employees demonstrate the value of working at your company, while having your actual customers or clients demonstrate the value of using your product or service. This way, your message will be as authentic as possible.


 

You might also like: 

What Role Does Storytelling Play in Employer Branding, With Answers from 10 Experts
10 Questions To Diagnose Your Company’s Employer Brand Reputation
How To Rescue Your Employer Brand After A Crisis
Uber, Facebook and Wells Fargo Going Through Employer Branding Makeovers with their Latest Video Campaigns
10 Statistics That Show How Employer Branding Impacts The Job Search (with INFOGRAPHIC) 
How To Inspire Your Employees To Become Your Company’s Employer Brand Advocates

 

For more best practices on employer branding and attracting talent into your organization, check out our free resources that we’ve made specifically for company leaders, HR and talent acquisition teams.


Linda Le Phan
Senior Content Marketing Manager at kununu.

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